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Come on Tonk! We’re all going to Neverland!


ladyjeynewesterling:

Disney princesses + character traits


happy2bsad:

Buy this print here

happy2bsad:

Buy this print here



free-booty:

I don’t mean to interrupt people I just randomly remember things and get really excited I’m sorry


delusioninabox:

Daily #492! Some days may even be a bit of both.


puppypowerforever:

My new favourite tweet. (x)

puppypowerforever:

My new favourite tweet. (x)


catsbeaversandducks:

Meerkats make the best photographer’s assistants EVER.

Via BuzzFeed



between-love-lines:

abessinier:

engiebooty:

thekumazone:

Mom boat!!

“KIDS ARE YOU FIGHTING BACK THERE”

“I WILL TURN MYSELF AROUND”

THE MOTHERSHIP

I AM SO DONE


punkrockluna:

This summer… Two supporting characters from a beloved Shakespeare classic adopt a child! Hijinks ensue in— Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dad


therealshingetter1 asked: "Excuse me, I saw your post on Greek lore inaccuracies, and I have a question. In the story explaining how Hades kidnaps Persephone, it's often called "The Rape of Persephone". Did this actually happen within context, or is it a mistranslation or an exaggeration or something else? It's been bugging me for years now and I'd appreciate your opinion on the matter."

lyriumpomegranates:

soloontherocks:

Rape in historical context means “kidnap”. Rape might have been involved, of course, possibly, but the name of the myth itself is not a reference to it.

For instance, the Rape of the Lock is a poem about someone stealing a lock of hair without permission from a maiden with beautiful hair.

I will point out that regardless of what might or might have happened beforehand, Haides is probably the best husband in all of Greek mythology. He has only two affairs — which let’s face it is pretty big for a Greek deity — and Persephone rules as his equal, not his inferior wife.

I’ll also point out that Persephone’s myth is a strong metaphor for a woman’s life — through the lens of an ancient Greek understanding of women, of course — and this is HUGELY important to context.

At the beginning she is nothing, a minor flower goddess, her entire identity merely “Demeter’s daughter”, even her name — Kore — just meant “the maiden.” Akin to how in childhood a daughter’s role was to be (quite literally, if you’re familiar with ancient Greek marriage law) owned by her parents. A daughter’s identity is as their parents’ daughter, nothing more. How many teenage girls have complained over the years as not being recognized as individuals with their own tastes and personality?

Then she gets carried off by a man who wishes to marry her…and I’ll point out in many more detailed versions of the myth Haides asks Zeus’ permission first. Which of course is a clear reference to a man meeting with a father to discuss the arranged marriage of the daughter. Mind you, ancient Greek wedding ceremony included a mock kidnapping. That was part of how they understood weddings to work. Also, of course, this was ancient Greece, women did not have much of a say in who they married.

THEN Persephone gets taken to the underworld — her husband’s “house” — and that’s when the most important part happens. Haides does not force her to eat the pomegranate seeds that doom her to spend half the year in the Underworld. She chooses to eat them. And if you think one of the most important goddesses in all of mythology was too stupid to know what that would mean, well, you probably need to rethink your understanding of Deity. But yes, Persephone CHOOSES to eat them.

Why? Because beforehand she was her mother’s daughter, Kore, the girl-child. After, she is Persephone, queen of the underworld and equal partner in her husband’s affairs. In myth she repeatedly overrules his decisions, even, or makes decisions for him. Her power only comes to her when she becomes an adult, through marriage. Mind you, the pomegranate is a classic strong symbol of female power and creation and mystery (not to mention, uh, blood). It’s overall a blatant representation of the tranformation from girlhood to womanhood. Yes, this was ancient Greece, so they assumed a woman would always wind up married. But in ancient Greece, a girl was without power. A married woman, however, basically ran the entire household and estate. The husband had shit to do, the wife was the one who commanded the servants and made business decisions for the household while the husband was out soldiering or whatever. A married woman was basically the most powerful thing a girl could possibly hope to be in ancient Greece.

Even without that ancient Greek view, it’s still a powerful metaphor for even modern womanhood. Because she CHOOSES to eat the pomegranates. She CHOOSES to become an adult.

Whatever happened with Haides before that, it’s irrelevant. Unimportant. Haides is important and good in her life because he assists in her transition to adulthood — he literally makes it possible — the way a good Greek husband does, and then proceeds to be an excellent husband, by mythology standards. She would never have become a woman under her mother’s roof.

Also, of course, there’s the whole “the myths are not meant to be taken literally in this religion and if you do the ancients will laugh at you as if you were a grownup who believed in Santa Claus” thing at play, so even if the story did include rape, it’s not literal, it’s a metaphor.

Mention because I’m going to answer this publicly and I don’t know if you follow me: therealshingetter1

If you’re still interested in the subject, elaphos is a Haides devotee.

I LOVE THIS POST. BLESS YOU OP


jarpad:

do you ever just stop and think about your obsession with something and say to yourself “oh man, i’m in too deep


chubbymanatee:

ah how could i forget to post my own blackout poetry piece

chubbymanatee:

ah how could i forget to post my own blackout poetry piece


stephenhawqueen:

WE’VE WALKE D ON THE FUCKIGN MOON BUT I CANT WEAR SHORT S TO SCHOOL BECAUSE SOME GROSS 15 YEAR OLD WILL C;UM IN HIS PANTS IF HE SEES LEGS